Architects and Designers

Calatrava’s Milwaukee Art Museum

Calatrava Museum of Art Milwaukee… As my beloved mom use to say, “beauty is as beauty does” and the art museum fulfilled that dictum of beautiful form and successful function. It is truly a “precious” museum, full of substance but not overwhelming, a perfect amuse bouche.

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Architects and Their Chairs “K”

"K" is for Kurokawa Kisho Kurokawa struggled to get commissions early in his career and was so poor he made his models from noodles, photographed them after they were dry, then cooked and ate them. SMH.comau *Kurokawa, was a founding member of the influential...

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Dame Zaha Mohammad Hadid 1950-2016

With a sad heart I thought I would share some quotes, some posts and just a smattering of the rich legacy Zaha left behind....     "Zaha Hadid’s work transcended a specific gender, religion, culture or space." SyndiGate.info http://www.albawaba.com/via...

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Bauhaus color

The walls are painted to match the architectonic divisions of the room precisely. Just as the room is divided into two sections, the ceiling is divided into two rectangular fields of color. Sourced through Scoop.it from: thecharnelhouse.org great images and written as...

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Architects and Their Chairs “J”

  "J" is for Juhl   Finn Juhl (30 January 1912 – 17 May 1989) was a Danish architect, interior and industrial designer. Juhl was most notably known for his furniture design and for introducing Danish Modern to America in the 1940's. "Juhl’s life was, in fact, a...

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Architects and Their Chairs “I”

                         "I" is for Isozaki Arata Isozaki was born in Oita City, Japan, in 1931. He studied with Kenzo Tange, one of Japan's leading modern architects, at the University of Tokyo from 1950 to 1954.  He worked for Tange for a number of years and then...

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Architects and Their Chairs “H”

                      "H" is for Henningsen   Poul Henningsen, 1894-1967, Danish architect, writer, multi-artist. On the background of the emancipated radical cultural environment of the 1920s he displayed great inventiveness in many fields.Official website of...

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Architects and Their Chairs “G”

                        "G" is for Gehry      Frank Owen Gehry was born in Toronto, Canada on February 28, 1929. He studied at the University of Southern California and Harvard University. Frank was creative at a young age, building imaginary homes and...

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Architects and Their Chairs “F”

           "F" is for Ferrari-Hardoy   Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy and The Butterfly Chair   Ferrari-Hardoy is one of the most important architects of Argentina. He belongs to the generation of Argentinean architects that advocated the ideas of modernism....

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Architects and Their Chairs “E”

                        "E" is for Eiermann Egon Eiermann 1948 Egon Eiermann (September 29, 1904 – July 20, 1970) was one of Germany's most prominent architects in the second half of the 20th century. A functionalist, his major works include: the textile mill at...

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Architects and Their Chairs “D”

         "D" is for Deganello   "Nowadays, designers have to go against the market, they have to head in an ecologically sustainable direction. They have to be brave enough to bite the hand that feeds them," Paolo Deganello declares decisively. Paolo Deganello...

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Architects and Their Chairs “C”

        C is for Castiglioni      "Start from scratch. Stick to common sense. Know your goals and means". Achille Castiglioni (February 26, 1918 - December 2, 2002) was a renowned Italian industrial designer. He was often inspired by everyday things and made...

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An Architect Reflects From Across The Pond

I am pleased to introduce my guest this month, Meto Mihaylov, Architect · Basel, Switzerland ·  Meto spent Christmas with our family in 2006 when he attended Westtown School in Pennsylvania, with my son Joshua.  Lo and behold, we recently connected again (thank you...

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Architectural Lighting Nuances Nature

The beautiful Solvesborg bridge in Sweden         Completed in 2013, the Solvesborg Bridge in Sweden is the longest pedestrian bridge in Europe. The bridge consists of a higher part made out of three characteristic vaults and a long wooden bridge for pedestrians....

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The Essence of a Miesian Dwelling

The Farnsworth House is a 1,500 sq.ft home designed and constructed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe between 1945-51. It is a one-room weekend retreat in a once-rural setting. The design is recognized as a masterpiece of the International Style of architecture and was...

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Imperfection: A Look At Wabi Sabi

      "Instinctively I was drawn to the beauty of things coarse and unrefined; things rich in raw texture and rough tactility. Often these things are reactive to the effects of weathering and human treatment. And lastly, I was attracted to the beauty of...

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InteriorDesign: Embracing an Eclectic Style

Sometimes it takes a leap of faith to "mix it up" when decorating a space. An eclectic approach, or mixing it up refers  to combining seemingly disparate styles of furniture and accessories. That could include: an industrial coffee table, a Scandinavian style sofa, a...

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Paul Rudolph: Concrete Connoisseur

In a small Kentucky town, Paul Rudolph was born to a nomadic Methodist preacher in 1918. His unique childhood was spent traveling the American south from church to church. The charm of these pious concrete structures and other regional landmarks inspired Rudolph to...

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