“D” is for Deganello

 

Paolo Deganello via Interiors - Culture dell'Abitare

Paolo Deganello via Interiors – Culture dell’Abitare

“Nowadays, designers have to go against the market, they have to head in an ecologically sustainable direction. They have to be brave enough to bite the hand that feeds them,” Paolo Deganello declares decisively.

Paolo Deganello was born in Este (Padua) in 1940. After graduating with honours from the Faculty of Architecture in Florence in 1966, he opened the studio Arquitectura Radical Archizoom Associati that same year, along with Andrea Branzi, Gilberto Corretti and Massimo Morozzi. He worked at the studio until it disbanded in 1972. He then began freelancing in Milan, which he still does today, combining his architectural and design projects with teaching positions. Since 2006, he teaches at ESAD in Matosiñho (Oporto) and since 2008 at the Architecture Faculty in Alghero (Italy).
His work is featured in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Design Museum (London), the Museum of Modern Art (Toyama, Japan), the Denver Museum (Denver, USA), the Vitra Design Museum (Weil am Rhein, Germany), the Museo do Design of the Cultural Centre of Belem (Lisbon) and the Museo del Design della Triennale in Milan.  via  experimenta magazine

 

  A pair of "Torso" high back sculptural chairs redone in silver Pewter leather designed by Paolo Deganello for Cassina in 1982. Visually interesting and comfortable.


A pair of “Torso” high back sculptural chairs redone in silver Pewter leather designed by Paolo Deganello for Cassina in 1982. Visually interesting and comfortable.

 

 

Paolo Deganello, Regina chairs for Zanotta Italy 1991 Designer: Paolo Deganello Provenance: Italy Material: Leather & Cowskin

Paolo Deganello Regina chairs for Zanotta Italy 1991
Designer: Paolo Deganello
Provenance: Italy
Material: Leather & Cowskin

 

 

mies’ chaise longue, 1969. design archizoom .manufactured by poltronova. courtesy paolo deganello

mies’ chaise longue, 1969.
design archizoom .manufactured by poltronova.
courtesy paolo deganello

 

 

Playful 80's Italian sofa with serious style. Seat in leather and back upholstered in a specially-commissioned Jack Lenor Larsen material entitled "La Madre" ("The Mother"). From Deganello's "Torso" series for Cassina. 1stdibs


Playful 80’s Italian sofa with serious style. Seat in leather and back upholstered in a specially-commissioned Jack Lenor Larsen material entitled “La Madre” (“The Mother”). From Deganello’s “Torso” series for Cassina. 1stdibs

 

                                                   AEO 1973

“When Paolo Deganello, cofounder of the Archizoom group from Florence, Italy, presented the “AEO” chair in 1973, it attracted great attention. The chair is undeniably comfortable, but opinions differ on its unusual appearance. One side regards it as a caricature of the robust television chair, the other as an icon of a new functional aesthetic.   Deganello does not comply with a particular aesthetic convention but instead sets the different qualities off against each other.”  Vitra Design Museum

 

Vitra Design Museum Design: 1973 Production: 1973 to the present Manufacturer: Cassina

Vitra Design Museum
Design: 1973
Production: 1973 to the present
Manufacturer: Cassina

 

 “We need to turn design inside out, like a glove”

Paolo Deganello  06/30/2010

Based on his participation in the seminar Less is Next held on World Food Day, Paolo Deganello uses the crisis as a starting point to reflect upon the kind of role architects and designers should play in organising a fairer professional practice, rooted in the defence of new, ethical values.

He goes on to say, “now that we are faced with economic crisis and the ever more dramatic destruction of the planet’s resources. My proposal, which I had already been advocating for some years, was that we must change all our schools of design into schools of socially responsible and/or sustainable design.”

from Experimenta Magazine Spain

learn more from Paolo Deganello, watch the video My Radical Project Architecture and Eco Design

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