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Archive for the ‘Vienna Secession in Design’ Category

Architects and Their Chairs “L”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On December 15th

 

                                “L” Is For Loos

Adolf Loos, 1922 /Trude Fleischmann /sc                                                       Adolf Loos, 1922 /Trude Fleischmann /sc

 “What I call culture is that balance between our physical, mental and spiritual being which alone can guarantee sensible thought and action.”       Adolf Loos

 

Adolf Loos was born in Brünn in the Austro-Hungarian Empire (now Brno, Czech Republic) in 1870 and died on August 23, 1933. “He was one of the most influential European architects of the late 19th century and is often noted for his literary discourse that foreshadowed the foundations of the entire modernist movement.” archdaly

 

"Knieschwimmer" easy chair by Adolf Loos, 1905

              “Knieschwimmer” easy chair by Adolf Loos, 1905

                                      Adolf Loos and the Vienna Secession
A group of artists and designers in Austria become known as the Vienna Secession. In 1897 they withdrew from the Vienna Academy in protest because the Academy would not accept modernist works. Gustav Klimt the painter headed up the group.

In Austria the Vienna Secession group of artists and designers created a form of Art Nouveau. The Vienna Secession group of creative individuals had a great impact on what we call modern design.    CreativeBuzzingwordpress.com

 

Set of 6 Adolf Loos Thonet Vienna Café Museum Art Nouveau Bentwood Chairs

Set of 6 Adolf Loos Thonet Vienna Café Museum Art Nouveau Bentwood Chairs

 

Adolf Loos studied architecture in Bohemia and Dresden and was influenced by a three-year stay in the United States (1893-96) where he was impressed by the innovative efficiency of American industrial buildings. Speaking about the development of his Raumplan design in 1930, Adolf Loos said: “My architecture is not conceived in plans, but in spaces (cubes). I do not design floor plans, facades, sections. I design spaces. For me, there is no ground floor, first floor etc…. For me, there are only contiguous, continual spaces, rooms, anterooms, terraces etc. Storeys merge and spaces relate to each other. Every space requires a different height: the dining room is surely higher than the pantry, thus the ceilings are set at different levels. To join these spaces in such a way that the rise and fall are not only unobservable but also practical, in this I see what is for others the great secret, although it is for me a great matter of course.”                               http://www.e-architect.co.uk/architects/adolf-loos

socks-studio.com bit.ly/2hKZQxY

                                     socks-studio.com bit.ly/2hKZQxY

Villa Müller in Prague was designed by architect Adolf Loos, assisted by architect Karel Lhota, in 1930 for František Müller and his wife, Milada Müllerová. The client was the owner of a company that specialized in reinforced concrete, so the house was to be a showcase of this (at the time) pioneering technique as well as of the influence of the architect’s theories. The Villa, with its cubic shape and its white and austere façade, embodies in its exterior appearance the principles expoused by the architect in his seminal essay “Ornament and Crime”.     socks-studio.com

 

Adolf Loos, Villa Muller, 1928-1930.                                                             Adolf Loos, Villa Muller, 1928-1930.

mullerovavila.cz                                                             Adolf Loos, Villa Muller, 1928-1930.

 

“The best draftsman can be a poor architect, the best architect a poor draftsman.” Adolf Loos

‘Adolf Loos led the way towards the International Style with several built projects and essays, like his seminal 1908 work ‘Ornament and Crime’. In Le Corbusier’s own words: ‘Loos swept right beneath our feet, and it was a Homeric cleansing — precise, philosophical and logical. In this Loos has had a decisive influence on the destiny of architecture.’    Read more at: wallpaper.com

 

His work has influenced so many architect’s and continues to make it’s impact still today. “The Raumplan concept, developed by Loos in the 1920s as an alternative to traditional stacked floor levels. Instead, he proposed dividing a house’s interior into interconnected multi-level spaces arranged on the basis of their importance.

 

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Adolf Loos Armchair FO Schmidt Austria, 1900 mahogany, brass, leather, brass-plated steel

Adolf Loos Armchair FO Schmidt Austria, 1900 mahogany, leather, brass-plated steel

Elegant Pair of Club Chairs with Bolster Att to Adolf Loos image via 1stdibs

Elegant Pair of Club Chairs with Bolster Att to Adolf Loos image via 1stdibs

1930's Design, Furniture, Applied & Decorative Arts Adolf Loos

1930’s Design, Furniture, Applied & Decorative Arts Adolf Loos
Austria. Loos Drinking Set, c. 1930 // designer Adolf Loos: Lobmeyer

 

Adolf Loos was involved with the group but became concerned with what he thought was a superficial decorative slant in the movement. His work includes bentwood furniture for Thonet.

Adolf Loos was involved with the group but became concerned with what he thought was a superficial decorative slant in the movement. His work includes bentwood furniture for Thonet.

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