Architects and Their Chairs “F”

Architects and Their Chairs “F”

           “F” is for Ferrari-Hardoy

 

The first of the Butterfly chairs came out of the Argentinian architectural firm, Grupo Austral, in 1938. The Austral Group was comprised of Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy, Juan Kurchan and Antoni Bonet (Catalonia), who had met as assistants in Le Corbusier's Paris atelier. The chair is occasionally known as the BKF chair, for Bonet-Kurchan-Ferrari.

Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy and The Butterfly Chair

 

Ferrari-Hardoy is one of the most important architects of Argentina. He belongs to the generation of Argentinean architects that advocated the ideas of modernism.

Ferrari-Hardoy studied until 1937 at the renowned “Escuela de Arquitectura” in Buenos Aires. He then went to Europe and spent a few months in Paris. Inspired by Le Corbusier who – as a representative of the „Congres Internationaux d’Architecture Moderne“ (CIAM) – had a particular interest in Latin America, Ferrari-Hardoy worked closely with him on the elaboration of a first urban master plan for Buenos Aires. In addition, Ferrari-Hardoy was lecturer at the “Escuela Industrial” in La Plata, the “Escuela de Arquitectura y Urbanismo de la Universidad del Litoral” and at the University of Buenos Aires.

 

Edificio Los Eucaliptus / Jorge Ferrari Hardoy + Juan Kurchan

Edificio Los Eucaliptus / Jorge Ferrari Hardoy + Juan Kurchan

 

His Architectural firm, Austral developed pioneering projects, discussed the relevant aspects of contemporary architecture, and participated in exhibitions, competitions and conferences. Moreover, the group members were actively seeking international exposure; they exchanged ideas with architects from other countries and published the magazine “Nosotros”. In addition, Austral organized cultural events and included painters, sculptors, musicians, photographers, doctors, sociologists and educators in their work.

 

 

image via The Modern View - Weinbaum

image via The Modern View – Weinbaum

 

Starting in 1937 the office had been charged with the planning works for a university town on the site of the old port of Buenos Aires, residential buildings in the southern part of the city as well as the construction of hospitals, sports facilities and schools along the central avenue Corrientes. At all their works, Ferrari-Hardoy promoted the use of composable industrial elements and employed curved glass panels and sun visors, as evidenced by the “Ateliers” (1938) at the corner Suipacha and Paraguay. Together with Juan Kurchan he developed from 1941 to 1944 a residential complex in the district of Belgrano. The building became quickly popular because of its implanted tree inside the patio.  The Modern View _ Weinbaum

 

Colorful Marimekko KIVET fabric adorns these cheerful butterflies. Don't you just love the way they stand out against the colors in the landscape? by Jeffrey Gordon Smith Landscape Architecture http://bit.ly/1DDPB0C

Colorful Marimekko KIVET fabric adorns these cheerful butterflies. Don’t you just love the way they stand out against the colors in the landscape?
by Jeffrey Gordon Smith Landscape Architecture http://bit.ly/1DDPB0C

 

 

The BKF chair is a modern update of the Paragon chair which was first made for use as campaign furniture in the 1870s. A later version of the design was known as the Tripolina chair, a portable chair introduced in the early 20th century. Jorge Ferrari Hardoy along with Antonio Bonet and Juan Kurchan developed the BKF in 1938 for an apartment building they designed in Buenos Aires. On July 24, 1940, the chair was shown at the 3rd Salon de Artistas Decoradores exhibition where it was discovered by the Museum of Modern Art. At the request of MoMA design director Edgar Kaufmann Jr., Hardoy sent 3 pre-production chairs to New York. One is in the MoMA collection and one is at the Frank Lloyd Wright house Fallingwater, but no one knows where the third chair went. Naming the BKF as one of the “best efforts of modern chair design,” Kaufmann accurately predicted that it would become extremely popular in the US.  Wikipedia

 

 

black-butterfly-chair black leather buttery Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy butterfly chair from Stella Harasek’s home.
Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy butterfly chair from Stella Harasek’s home. http://bit.ly/1CtxhG1

 

 

Found on houseandhome.com
Found on houseandhome.com

 

 

Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948.
The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.

 

 

The mural at Rose Seidler House (designed by Harry Seidler) sundeck and reproduction Hardoy chairs. Photographer: Justin Mackintosh The Rose Seidler House was designed by Harry Seidler for his parents, Max and Rose, and is located in Wahroonga, on the outskirts of Sydney. Built in the late 1940s, it was his first Australian commission. It is a minimalist, open-plan design with all the modern conveniences of the day. Found on blog.selector.com

The mural at Rose Seidler House (designed by Harry Seidler) sundeck and reproduction Hardoy chairs. Photographer: Justin Mackintosh

The Rose Seidler House was designed by Harry Seidler for his parents, Max and Rose, and is located in Wahroonga, on the outskirts of Sydney. Built in the late 1940s, it was his first Australian commission. It is a minimalist, open-plan design with all the modern conveniences of the day. Found on blog.selector.com

Appreciated by connoisseurs, hipsters and students alike, the butterfly also presaged the disposable-furniture onslaught a half-century later. “It appeared at a moment when there was such a demand for cheap furniture, but furniture that identified with a new aesthetic,” Kinchin says. “You’ve got this burst of color and fun really coming into midcentury modern interiors.” Today MoMA holds a Hardoy in its permanent collection, and Walmart sells one for $39. Somehow it all makes sense.“It’s so minimal,” Dror Benshetrit, designer of the well-regarded Peacock Chair, says of its high-low appeal. “It’s so effortless.”  By HILARY GREENBAUM and DANA RUBINSTEIN  NYTimes Magazine 2012

 

Jorge Ferrari Hardoy-Butterfly 經典蝴蝶椅 W82 x D85 x H96 cm Manufactured by Knoll International of USA, designed by Jorge Ferrari Hardoy, 1938.
Jorge Ferrari Hardoy-Butterfly
經典蝴蝶椅
W82 x D85 x H96 cm
Manufactured by Knoll International of USA,
designed by Jorge Ferrari Hardoy, 1938.

 

An example of some of the chairs other monikers: the B.K.F. Chair, Hardoy Chair, Butterfly Chair, Safari Chair, Sling Chair, or Wing ChairAn estimated 5 million of these chairs were produced during the 1950′s by numerous manufacturers under various names.The tubular steel frame was enamelled and the sling seat was leather. http://bebob.eu/en/designer/hardoy-ferrari/

The B.K.F. chair,  patented in 1877, was originally mass-produced by Artek-Pascoe. In 1945 Knoll took over production and it was a tremendous success. Unlicensed knock-offs and the loss of a Knoll copyright suit have made this one of the most copied chairs of modern design and it became one of the most widely copied chairs in existence. http://bebob.eu/en/designer/hardoy-ferrari/

 

 

Life of and Architect http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/knoll-hardoy-butterfly-chairs/

Life of and Architect
http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/knoll-hardoy-butterfly-chairs/

 

 

Found on m.cb2.com 1938 bergama butterfly chair, on the wings of a classic. Bright new angles pop modern in a graphic twist on the 1938 Hardoy Chair, aka the "Butterfly." Envisioned by Brooklyn-based designer Aelfie Oudghiri as a Turkish kilim, the handwoven flatweave dhurrie is inspired by the colorful coastal scene of American beach towns. Aqua, sour apple and white geometric forms radiate bold on a sunny orange backdrop, reflecting the iconic seascape dotted with ice cream shops, hot dog stands and surfers. Hand-whipstitched edge to edge in sour apple on a substantial tubular iron frame antiqued light zinc.

Found on m.cb2.com
1938 bergama butterfly chair
on the wings of a classic. Bright new angles pop modern in a graphic twist on the 1938 Hardoy Chair, aka the “Butterfly.” Envisioned by Brooklyn-based designer Aelfie Oudghiri as a Turkish kilim, the handwoven flatweave dhurrie is inspired by the colorful coastal scene of American beach towns. Aqua, sour apple and white geometric forms radiate bold on a sunny orange backdrop, reflecting the iconic seascape dotted with ice cream shops, hot dog stands and surfers. Hand-whipstitched edge to edge in sour apple on a substantial tubular iron frame antiqued light zinc.

 

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An Architect Reflects From Across The Pond

An Architect Reflects From Across The Pond

I am pleased to introduce my guest this month, Meto Mihaylov, Architect · Basel, Switzerland ·  Meto spent Christmas with our family in 2006 when he attended Westtown School in Pennsylvania, with my son Joshua.  Lo and behold, we recently connected again (thank you Facebook), and my charming Bulgarian friend is now an architect!  So naturally I queried….

 

Q:  What led you to become an architect, your favorite architect/s?  Did your time living in the U.S. influence you in any way?

 

A:  My name is Meto. I come from Bulgaria. I have lived and studied in high school for one year in the USA. After this I studied architecture at a University in Denmark and now work as an architect in Switzerland.

In my culture it is normal to pick a profession at a very early age. I was a little kid when I saw the ancient city of Plovdiv for the first time. I fell in love with its old buildings and with its atmosphere, and decided that I wanted to become an architect.

 

Untitled

 

NYC made the biggest impression on me when I was in the USA and solidified my intention to study and do buildings. Please visit this city at least once in your life if you can.

At University I learned more and more about the contemporary work of the 20th and 21st century. It is scary to see how Professors in Europe teach architectural theory no different than religion is taught in a religion class. “Le Corbusier is God, and if you question any of what I tell you- you are dumb”. I like it when people question things and point out defects in buildings. This is a constructive way to work and achieve better results. Architects must not be the ones who judge architecture because they are too immersed into it and lose the objectivity. We do not build for architects- we build for people, for children, for shopping, for doctors etc. I like to ask friends and family to give me their opinion on my buildings during the design process, because their view tends to be much more objective, human, and overall better than when I ask my colleagues.

My list of professional influences reflects my worldview. There are certain architects whom I like, but I always try to be fair and see the pros and cons in their work. I do not believe in unconditionally worshiping an architect like I see many architect friends do. The character of a person, in architecture, always shows up in the work, so I like to study architects also as individuals, in order to understand their thought process better.

I like the organic form of Oscar Niemeyer but even more I like his overall organic approach to life. The houses of John Lautner have a similar effect- a completely revised space which makes life better. He was also very good at sustainable budget houses, not only the houses for the rich, like the one in the movie “The big Lebowski”. When it comes to the ever-present-for-good-or-bad field of Modernism, I find Paul Rudolph to be the one who really cracked the code of the modern form and proportion, overcoming the haunting sterility of modernist structures.

 

nie

Lautner

 

I recently had the good fortune to hear SeARCH’s Bjarne Mastenbroek present his way of seeing things and I found a lot of common ground with him. He works in the real world, where he has a budget amidst a financial crisis, and has to build residential buildings and schools in Holland two times cheaper and three times better than twenty years ago. When you manage to do something like this, you are truly creative and innovative, and a real architect, unlike someone like Zaha Hadid, who gives someone sketches of an unknown spaceship, budget- unknown, energy requirements for building it and after- unknown, building time- unknown, “oh, and by the way- I designed it but you have to build it yourself, because I can’t”. So, back to Mastenbroek, and I will leave you with him. He will build the first passive hotel in the ski resort of St. Moritz in the Swiss Alps, where, until now, only the richest of the rich built the most unsustainable, most expensive villas possible (Norman Foster built his own house there). Mastenbroek made a research and he will heat the hotel with 60 cows, which in winter will produce more heat just in staying inside glass rooms, than a radiator or floor heating. No cars allowed, you will have to reach the place on a dog sled. The sloping roof will be a part of the ski slope. The Swiss government, based in the capital city of Bern, is going to discuss changing the law of the Canton (State) of Graubünden in 2014, so that the crazy Dutchman can do the cow hotel. Keep an eye out, you will see it happen soon.

 

SeArCH

 

Be careful with architects. I can tell you that this industry often makes people extremely selfish and gives them a mania for fame. They stop wanting to make the world a better place and start wanting only attention. Please do not trust that single persons create buildings just because the media find it much easier to give you a single name. Even Mastenbroek cannot complete a house alone. Buildings are done by dozens of people and it is real teamwork that brings about a great result in the form of a built structure. Thank you for reading this and look for the architecture that makes a true innovation.

 

Architect Meto Mihaylov Zentrum Paul Klee (by Renzo Piano) — in Bern, Switzerland. Paradigm Gallery's photo.

Architect Meto Mihaylov
Zentrum Paul Klee (by Renzo Piano) — in Bern, Switzerland.
Paradigm Gallery’s photo.

 

 

 

 

How Charlotte Perriand Influenced Le Corbusier’s Work

How Charlotte Perriand Influenced Le Corbusier’s Work

Charlotte Perriand (Photo Courtesy of Flickr User Knowtex)

“Life was good…and I filled my lungs with it.” -Charlotte Periand

At 24 years old, Charlotte Perriand made a lasting impression on Le Corbusier, when she walked into his studio and asked for a job as a furniture designer. His response? He showed her the door and replied, “We don’t embroider cushions here”.

However, Perriand quickly earned his apology. A few months later, Le Corbusier saw the impressive “glacial Bar sous le Toît” (rooftop bar) that Perriand had created in glass, chrome, and aluminum, for the Salon D’Automne exhibition in Paris. After seeing this amazing display of Charlotte’s talent, he invited her to come join him in his studio.

Together with Le Corbusier, and his partner Pierre Jeanneret, Charlotte Perriand designed a series of tubular steel chairs, based on Corbusier’s principles. These chairs were then – and continue today – to be hailed as icons of the “machine age”.

Many would say that the most famous Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret models may never have existed as we know them, had it not been for Charlotte Perriand. She was recognized by Le Corbusier as having extraordinary talent for interior design.

Although Charlotte was loyal to the concept of Corbusier, she was free to steer the project to its end result. This type of relationship between designer and company created a beautiful harmony that resulted in some amazing works. Each piece renders a quality design and an expression of minimum values, yet with profound depth.

In addition to her work as a respected designer, Charlotte was also very socially conscious. She strongly advocated for improved social conditions and quality of life, and was involved with many organizations such as:

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Mid-Century Modern Furniture Evolution: 7 Designers Who Changed the Industry

Learn about all of your favorite mid-century modern furniture designers before you begin your search for that perfect piece of furniture:

  1. Le Corbusier: Pioneer of “Modern” Furniture and Architecture
  2. Mies van der Rohe: Mid Century Design – Glass and Steel Architect Extraordinaire
  3. Eero Saarinen: Curling Up in Mid-Century Modern Furniture
  4. Arne Jacobsen: Danish Influenced Modern Furniture
  5. Poul Kjaerholm: The Final Figure of Danish Furniture Design
  6. Hans J. Wegner: Simple and Elegant Minimalist Design
  7. Marcel Lajos Breuer: International Style

Now that you’ve seen what some of the most popular designers have made, you can choose what type of modern furniture you want for your home.

If you’re still not 100 percent sure what piece of furniture you want, you should check out popular pieces like these:

 

– Lynne

Le Corbusier Hotel Marseille

Le Corbusier Hotel Marseille

Le Corbusier Hotel, Marseille Photo Courtesy of HotelsWeLove.com

One rainy afternoon I came across a fabulous website, Hotels We Love.  The following is a small excerpt from their “about us” to share the passion that drives them towards more amazing discoveries.  “Hotels we love are personal, creative and inspiring, with that special quality the Dane’s describe as hygge. Hygge loosely translates as ‘cosy’, but it’s more than that, it suggests a sense of well-being, a moment in time when people and space fall into place and create a warm, special kind of ambiance. A kind of bonhomie applied to space.”

These talented videographers have captured a unique view of Le Corbusier’s La Cite Radieuse, or Radiant City.   Please follow this link and take the time to enjoy  the short video.  This hotel is on my bucket list.  As the artists who created this story and video would ask, “are you a Le Corbusier tragic?”  I know I am, if you are too, please leave a short comment below.

http://hotelswelove.com/category/hotels-we-love-in/marseille/

Wonderful video of the Hotel Le Corbusier

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