VRG in studio   Abstract Modernist painter Victor Raul Garcia creates images which sync with their  surroundings. They are not the juxtaposed images of a still life in a kitchen, or a landscape in a foyer, but rather a living component of interior design. Abstract art finds a way to mirror our emotions in a way that realism can only do in very specific instances. Garcia was kind enough to grant Paradigm Gallery a deeper look into his creative process and what his work means to him. In a time in our societal progression when craftsmanship and artistry are taking a backseat to affordability and convenience, divergent perspectives are even more valuable.

Like the elegant simplicity of straight lines and ergonomics, the subtlety of curved steel and sensual leather, mid century modern furnishings are historically and aesthetically the perfect pairing for abstract art. So much of modern design at its very core provokes deep thought; thought beyond the simple nodding of one’s head in appreciation of a visage. Garcia’s body of work has inspired us, and we hope that his words can also inspire you.

Paradigm: How do you interact with a piece as it begins to take form?

VRG: Creating art is an emotional experience. I look at art as a sort of “Tango”: an interpretive dance where you (and your canvas) express to one another your needs, wants and desires, through movement, color, texture and strokes. Such an intimate interlude is this. Filled with a dopamine “release”, emotional synergy and physical exertion. It can only be experienced and not explained.

 

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“American Rose” 2’x4′ acrylic and poster paint on wood New York (2011)

 

Paradigm: What is the creative process for you?

VRG: A week prior to my studio time, I gather as much visual data as I can source. From ripping pages out of fashion and interior design magazines, to photographing vignettes at flower markets and textile showrooms, anything and everything that captures my eye’s attention goes into this reference library. Then based on my mood, I select several different images and try to create an ‘offspring’ of their combined attributes.

 

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“Lago” 4′ x 4′ acrylic,oil and enamel on wood New York (2009)

 

Paradigm: If you could pick one of your pieces to be discovered 150 years from now, which would it be?

VRG: That piece would definitely be “Soho.”  It evokes intrigue without intimidation; it satisfies all of the senses; and though open to interpretation by each viewer, the general reaction to it, I think, would be that of having just glimpsed into the intricate layers of a particular human being without having actually met them.

 

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“Soho”, 4′ X 4′ mixed media on wood, New York (2008)

 

Paradigm: Do you find that selling your works affects the integrity of your final products? Has becoming more successful in your career had an effect on your work?

VRG: I take pride in the fact that I give every piece I make, whether large or small, sold or not sold, expensive or inexpensive, praised or not praised, the same amount of attention as any other. I am a humble man and would never let success change who I truly am. But the one thing that success has changed about my work is that it has made me strive to challenge myself and raise the bar constantly, to never become stagnant or complacent. Reinvention and versatility are key.

 

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“Lavender Field” 4′ x 4′ acrylic,enamel and wood stain on wood, New York (2012)

 

Paradigm: If you are away from the studio for an extended period of time, what is it that you miss most about your craft?

VRG: The creative outlet that allows me to make perfect sense out of all the chaos in my mind.

 

You can follow VRG on Facebook and at his website Victor-Raul Garcia

Please take a minute to share with us your thoughts about art in your life and impressions and thoughts that crossed your mind while reading and viewing VRG’s work.

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“Untitled 47″ 48″ X 48” acrylic and wood stain on wood, New York (2012)

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“Untitlted LM” 36″ x 36″ acrylic,tempera and textile paint on wood, New York (2012)

 

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Untiltled December (2012)

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“Piel de Culebra” 45″x 45″ acrylic,enamel and wood stain on wood, New York (2012)

 

 

 jwvanden is a freelance journalist, blogger, and chef, specializing in sushi ….he can be contacted at The Chronic Masticator

 

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